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...and they lived happily ever after. Smith & Lady: poets, artists, photographers & adventurers.
Our relationship was forged to the soundtrack of Yoko Ono's magic,
frenetic, love-laden song, "Walking On Thin Ice." ( play song )
 
   
 
 

Archive for the ‘bad taste’ Category

Sad… bigly bigly sad

Thursday, March 9th, 2017


Trump on a stick

This sculpture by Tim Joyce looks a bit like Trump… of course the face would have to be fatter, the hair faker, the eyes beadier, the skin more fake orange if you wanted better verisimilitude.

Chief Small Hands Man

Tried to sell these honorifics
to Little Donnie Chump, but no go:

Hate-Monger-in-Chief
Child-Rapist-in-Chief
Tax-Cheat-in-Chief
Racist-in-Chief
Draft-Dodger-in-Chief
Xenophobe-in-Chief
Thief-in-Chief
Traitor-in-Chief
Hater-in-Chief
Serial-Liar-in-Chief
Sexual-Predator-in-Chief
Coward-in-Chief
Bad-Business-Man-in-Chief
Potty-Mouth-in-Chief
Not-as-Rich-as-He-Says-in-Chief
Anal-Orifice-in-Chief
Distractor-in-Chief
Vulgarian-in-Chief
Mob-Money-Launderer-in-Chief
Mentally-Unstable-in-Chief
Immoral-in-Chief
Bully-in-Chief
Pussy-Grabber-in-Chief
So-Vain-It’s-Insane-in-Chief
Deplorable-in-Chief
Despicable-in-Chief
Not-a-Very-Nice-Guy-in-Chief
Cretin-in-Chief
Fascist-in-Chief
No-Class-in-Chief
Oil-Whore-in-Chief
Loser-in-Chief
Perjurer-in-Chief
Adulterer-in-Chief
War-Monger-in-Chief
Misogynist-in-Chief
Untrustworthy-in-Chief
Screw-Native-Americans-in-Chief
Climate-Change-Denier-in-Chief
Fuck-the-Poor-in-Chief
hiner-in-Chief
Oblivious-in-Chief
Full-of-Feces-in-Chief
Wish-He’d-Just-Go-Away-in-Chief
Corporate-Whore-in-Chief
Trump-or-Truth-in-Chief
Cheater-in-Chief
Thug

Sad… bigly bigly sad.

– Smith, 3.9.2017

 

aggressive gas guzzling Labor Day jets gulp the sky

Monday, September 7th, 2015

cokegov

the Vietnam War was called the Coca-Cola War by some

Status Report 76

Aggressive gas guzzling Labor Day jets gulp the sky
killing our tax dollars for their propaganda . . .

Why do governments lie?

– Smith, 9.7.2015

downslide

the mouse that roared

 

Faux News

Monday, June 8th, 2015

nextwindowplease

Faux News

“Me”gyn Kelly and Lie O’Reilly,
willfully ignorant, or bigot?

No truth too small to lie
no fact too strong to wrong
they cotton to the contrary
of our country as a crime.

Kleptocrats and their twisted sifters.

Long Noose and Moses saunter through town
looking for supposes
crowning clown
holding their noses at the truthfully bound.

The flat-earth right seem mostly to be wrong
and strong in human feces.

Two-faced Texas slime need
crawl back under their flat-earth rocks
on those racist roads they walk.

I don’t know but I’ve been told
greed’s so cold it hurts the soul.

Bill O’Lielly and Rush Slimeball
two cancers on our soul
four buttcheeks soiling soil.

I don’t live my life in the remainder bin
won’t talk your talk or walk your when.

Said the spider to the fly
come zither, play my gland
fill my belly
help my waist expand.

Fox News prostitution
the obverse of Constitution.

We surf the curse of worse.

– Smith, 6.8.2015

funeralparkingonly

 

hot not

Friday, September 27th, 2013

Some seriously aggressively named and unpolitically correct hot sauce brand names
at the Asian spice shop this morning in the West Side Market.








impolite sauce – fotosmith

 

poetry, painting, people

Friday, October 22nd, 2010

American Ego, 1984 – collage & foto by Smith

Tonight, Friday October 22 at 7 pm, Lady K and I will be the opening featured poets at the Lix & Kix monthly reading at the Bela Dubby coffee shop art gallery & beer bar at 13321 Madison Ave, Lakewood, Oh, 44107, 216-221-4479. We’ll be followed by Elyria poet Alex Nielsen and NYC poet Puma Perl, winner of the 2009 Erbacce Prize for Poetry. Lix & Kix is celebrating its second anniversary of monthly readings and is co-hosted by Dianne Borsenik and John Burroughs (aka Jesus Crisis).

Next Friday, October 29th, Lady and I each have a piece in the 19th annual Peoples Art Show at CSU — Cleveland State University, Art Building, 2307 Chester Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44115-2214, 216.687.2103. I was in the first two People’s Art Shows back in 1984-85. The first year I won Most Outrageous Piece in Show, and the second year I won Most Original Use of Materials.

The first year I also was the subject of this Plain Dealer column by James Neff due to the titillating nature of my piece. When Neff first called me, he was hostile and sarcastic; but by the time we finished, he was warm and friendly.

Must Be Profound
James Neff
The Plain Dealer
December 3, 1984

Gracing our city are many profound examples of modern art. I know they must be profound because I do not understand them.

Take, for example, Isamu Noguchi’s sculpture “Portal” at the Justice Center. “Portal” still befuddles some citizens. It looks like a piece of a giant pretzel. The modern sculpture weighs 15 tons, stands 36 feet high and cost $100,000.

Art experts such as Sherman Lee called it “one of the best monumental sculptures produced in the world since World War II.”

To the untrained eyes of those who pass “Portal” each workday, it seems useless, just a giant pretzel. They might feel differently if they could snack on it.

Most of the modern art around here, however, is displayed indoors. That way, it won’t scare the horses.

At the Cleveland State University Art Gallery at E. 23rd ST. and Chester Ave., 172 area artists are displaying 335 creations, probably the largest such exhibit outside of the May show.

One such work certainly must be the most unusual work of so-called art to be put on display in our town.

The CSU gallery is full of paintings and sculptures you might enjoy. Abstract paintings full of interesting colors and shapes. A beautiful clear glass bowl. An oil portrait of a pretty woman in a pastel dress.

One sculpture is a chessboard; instead of the usual black and white pieces, the artist made them into Browns and Steelers football players.

Right when you come in, about 15 feet down on the left wall, is a work called “American Ego.” It is a collage of 12 snapshots, some of them splattered with tiny drops of paint.

The day I visited the gallery and witnessed “American Ego,” a group of CSU students in a beginning design class were checking the local artworks as a class exercise.

The class was mostly made up of women in their late teens, along with several young men.

When the students happened upon “American Ego,” many of them made comments. They did not remark about its composition, balance, vibrancy or classical execution. No, here is what they said.

“Gross,” said a young woman.

“That is embarrassing,” said another.

“Oh my God, it’s disgusting,” said a student named Janel Leurienzo. Then she added with sarcasm and a smile, “But, hey, it’s art.”

The 12 snapshots were arranged in a four-by-three grid. They were taken by Steven Smith. They were nude photos of himself.

This being an art gallery and all, you probably expect the photos to be the sort of classical pieces we associate with Greek art.

Oh no, this artist doesn’t mess around. The snapshots were of the real thing: close-ups of the guy’s, uh, groin area.

There were some different poses, to be sure. One was the guy’s private zone draped with a plastic fish.

Another was of a view of his bare buttocks. In this snapshot, rising up and proudly flying from between his upper thighs was one of those little American flags on a stick that you get at political rallies.

One photo treated us to a view of the artist’s personal part wrapped in Old Glory. The 12 photos were sewn onto what looked like those small, thin, square pillows you toss on your couch.

So there it was, an expression of modern art, hanging on a wall at a university for our appreciation.

The male student looked at “American Ego” from about three feet away and moved on. Many of the females looked much closer, maybe a foot away. Then moved on. Later, some of them drifted back alone for another, more private peek.

In their design class, the students discussed what they had just viewed. They liked most of it. Not surprisingly, they had a lot to say about “American Ego.”

A student named Tracy said, “It was different. They usually just show women.”

A young man named James said, “I thought it was funny.”

“I don’t think it was art at all,” Christie Gungl said.

Their teacher, Mary Stokrocki, an associate professor said after class, “I took it as pornographic. I think the university shouldn’t hang something pornographic. If I was curator for this show, I wouldn’t let people get away with that. There are certain things that are not art.”

The creator of the controversial piece, Steven Smith, was given a call. By day, he is a computer programmer out in the suburbs. By night, he lives in a warehouse downtown and makes things that hang in galleries.

“How did you get the idea for “American Ego,” he was asked.

“I was taking Polaroids of myself to get something going.”

“How often do you do this?”

“There’s very little nudity in what I do,” Smith said. “I think I’ve only had four pieces.”

“But what is ‘American Ego‘ supposed to mean?”

“It suggests the impotence of American foreign policy,” Smith said. “The false manhood, the macho thing, like in Grenada. Since we are all impotent in one sense, we try to overcome it. I don’t think we are living up to the American spirit when we tell people how to live.”

“Do people think you’re strange?” he was asked.

“Yes they do. I don’t fit in anywhere. Some artists in Cleveland are some of the nicest people I’ve met yet.”

Profound too. I know they must be profound because I do not understand them.

~ ~ ~

As I wrote in Criminal:

The pieces that got me my initial notoriety began late at night when I was drunk and wrapped my penis in small American flags, draped dead dried fish around, and snapped Polaroids. I felt the penis went with the flag because of our American Military might-makes-right philosophy, while the dried fish was a sly reference to the fish vagina smell of lore. I arranged 12 of the photos in a three by four grid, collaged the white areas around the Polaroids with torn strips of the American flag, splattered fluorescent paint on, glued down a large dried fish and some art glass scraps and titled it American Ego.
Then I took Polaroids of Masumi nude in an open shirt mom had made me out of old 48-star American flags. I arranged six of the photos into a cross, collaged the white area around the Polaroids with cut up bible pages, attached fringe to the bottom edges of the cross, pounded rusty nails into the photos, and titled it Cross Breeding.
Masumi was teaching art at CSU at the time, and John, a fellow instructor who had just begun, had brought the Peoples’ Art Show concept with him from Detroit. The idea, at least for the first few years, was no piece of art would be censored—the people could show whatever they wanted; everything submitted would be displayed. I contributed a couple interesting pieces I was proud of, but they weren’t shocking. John knew about my more controversial stuff from Masumi and mentioned to her he was hoping for something edgier to help jump start the show, so Masumi passed the word on to me and I gave him the two genitalia / American flag / dead fish pieces instead. They worked quite well, definitely jump started things.
Cleveland Plain Dealer columnist James Neff called me up during the show’s run and was quite hostile; he asked me “Why would you do such a thing?”
I told him it was a metaphor protesting America’s foreign policy–we’d just invaded Grenada illegally–and I explained my “American Ego” – “American Eagle” pun. By the end of the conversation, Neff was quite friendly and wrote a wry, fairly nice half page column.
My shock art is actually a pretty small percentage of what I do, especially anymore—usually I create stuff that’s odd, eccentric, weird, funny, beautiful, tender, political, social, serious or surreal, sometimes all at the same time. The scoundrel-sage Gurdjieff said people are asleep and often must be shocked awake to jumpstart their souls. Sometimes laughter’s enough; sometimes you can lure folk to new mindsets through intelligence, reason or beauty; and sometimes you just have to poke them with crude cattle prods to get their attention.
When Neff asked why I used nude male genitalia, and my own at that, I joked I was cheap and easy and available at the time; but mainly it was out of a sense of fairness. Respectable art and unrespectable advertising have always used naked women liberally. I dearly love naked women, often use them in collage. But I’ve also this large fairness complex, so to balance society’s and my nude female use, I used naked male me, myself and I.
There’s nothing wrong with shock. As Mae West said, “Those who are easily shocked should be shocked more often.” There are an endless number of paths to the same place. Everybody thinks it has to be A or B, but in reality, it’s A and Z and everything in between. It comes back to Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle: it’s all true all at the same time–it’s only lack of vision that reduces life or art to dichotomies.


Cross Breeding, 1984 – collage & foto by Smith

 

TESTAMENT

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

Original post down below. I am strongly feeling that the staples on my roof seem to think I was wrong & I tend to agree with them.

– – –
As a person with a BSEE,a background in neural nets and search engine optimization, I belive (believe) I am receiving scientific messages which could be interpreted as holy messages (for me they are one and the same.)

I am not entirely certain, but I think I heard on the radio that J (Lebron James) is Jesus. (I do believe, I think.) Hard to tell. Will try to be truthful in what I’m picking up.

Now, off to good faith work. Seems like a harsh think (thing) for a prophet, but I must do my work for my loved ones.

More later, if I can.

Peace out,

xok

K

Christmas Eve

 

OF TWEETS AND TWATS

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009

“You know where tweets would work, don’t you?,” Smith asks.

“I think tweets would work in twats,” I say.

“Why don’t you explore that more?” he says. “You could have some porno tweets. You could call them your twat tweets. I think you have something there. But actually, I meant tweets would work among family members cuz they don’t talk enough. Those little useless one-liners would give family members more information.”
 
. . .
 
“Have you ever thought about the carrying capacity of Earth?”
 
“Why yes,” I say. “I have thought of it quite frequently. Ever since I read Jonathan Swift’s parody where he advocates the English eat Irish children.”
 
. . .
 
On the theme of tweets & twats, here is a Mother Goose nursery rhyme I found for collage material:
 
LITTLE PUSSY
 
I like little Pussy,
  Her coat is so warm,
 
And if I don’t hurt her
  She’ll do me no harm;
 
So I’ll not pull her tail,
  Nor drive her away,
 
But Pussy and I
  Very gently will play.
 
 
WORD OF THE DAY DEPARTMENT
 
“My myrmidons shall mutiny,” I tell Smith. *

“Am I your myrmidon?” Smith asks?

“No, I’m your myrmidon.”

“Off with your clothes. You have to obey me. Off.”
 
 
*Myrmidon:
1. (Capitalized) A member of a warlike Thessalian people who followed Achilles on the expedition against Troy.
2. A loyal follower, especially one who executes orders without question
 
. . .
 
LATER…
 
“You’re not my myrmidon,” Smith sez. “You’re supposed to have your fvcking clothes off. You’re supposed to obey my orders without question.”
 
Lady

 

ad add

Saturday, April 11th, 2009

thrills — foto by Smith

In the 1960s a typical hour-long American TV show consisted of 51 minutes of programming and 9 minutes of advertisements.

Today’s hour show has 42 minutes of show and 18 minutes of ads, while a 30-minute show now includes 22 minutes of programming, 6 minutes of national advertising, and 2 minutes of local ads. This means an hour show is 30% advertising, while a half hour show is 27% ads.

And that’s not factoring in the in-show placement ads where the characters openly drink Coke and eat McFat burgers.

Of course the ad king is the yearly Super Bowl which attracts 90 million people and charges $2,700,000 for a 30 second ad – that’s NINETY THOUSAND DOLLARS A SECOND. Wow!!! Ninety million couch potatoes simultaneously watching someone else exercise – it boggles the mind, fattens the body.

Here are the 15 TV shows with the most expensive advertisement rates currently on the air according to Forbes.com.

TV show — cost of 30 second ad — weekly viewers
—————————————————————————–
American Idol — $623,000 — 25.6 million
24 — $366,000 — 11.7 million
Desperate Housewives — $251,000 — 15.2 million
Two and a Half Men — $227,000 — 14.1 million
Grey’s Anatomy — $224,000 — 13.4 million
Dancing with the Stars: Results — $205.000 — 16.8 million
Survivor: Gabon — $204,000 — 12.9 million
CSI — $201,000 — 18.2 million
Dancing with the Stars — $196,000 — 19.8 million
Brothers and Sisters — $195,000 — 10.1 million
Heroes — $194,000 — 7.9 million
House — $188,000 — 11.9 million
Worst Week — $174,000 — 9.3 million
Extreme Makeover: Home Edition — $169,000 — 10.5 million
Private Practice — $162,000 — 8.5 million

That comes out to $3,579,000 per 30 seconds for these 15 shows, or at least $42,948,000 per half hour for the 15 plus whatever they get for the two local ads each half hour.

I haven’t even heard of 6 of these shows and am proud to say I haven’t watch ANY of them. Don’t even own a TV. And I have NEVER stooped to watching the Super Bowl. Mom and I always used the Super Bowl to go downtown to the movies because the theaters would be empty.

An interesting side-bar to this ad mess is any show from the 1960s that is being rerun now has 9 minutes cut from the show so they can add more ads. That means some idiot is deciding which 9 minutes of plot, dialogue, jokes, drama, laughs, etc to cut so they can get you to eat more McFat.

Greed is destroying our creed and our breed.

Here are three old anti-TV poems of mine about the bad taste TV leaves in my mind:

~ ~ ~
T.V.O.D

The forgotten blindfold
acts on obsession
rides crooked trail
sweet smells success
hides blood money
warriors pit

(oh yea
it’s true
it’s true
it’s all true
even the lies
for)

Lies true speed colors night
graphics violence

~ ~ ~

In the Temple of the Echo

In the Temple of the Echo
in the moment of the mind
in the error of the airwaves
in the arrows of the kind
lies a hurting healing
taking pleasure to the tried
from forgotten shadows
on the ladders of the blind

Oh take me to your leader
to the maker of this slime
and at their feet I’ll wallow
worshiping the awful
waste their shallow taste
brings life’s kine
Sheep sadly settled
graze government gray
cheap badly saddled
approved payments pay
in first born chattel
less than cattle
while TV mentals
televise mime
breaking elemental
rights of mine
mind to mind

Hey in there . . .
anybody home?

~ ~ ~

I’m For Falling

Whining want weeps
Its winning way
From fool tool TV
Via too much tit
And botoxed brain
Showing shallow twits
In xeroxed pain
Damn little give
Whole lotta take
Turning from sun
To burning lake

I’m for falling
Falling down
Falling through air
Calling cloud
Free from err
Free from want
From wanting more
Free of lust
Of money whore
Free to trust
The ever more


resist — foto by Smith

 

unnotable notes

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

Mexican cake icing – foto by Smith

“Music hath charms to soothe a savage breast, to soften rocks, or bend a knotted oak.” William Congreve

I’ve heard a lot of good Mexican music, but none of it in our 15 months in Mexico. Down there the best I heard was Cuban jazz. Most Mexican music we heard was Mariachi horns, pumping oompa-oompa accordions, the soap operatic wailing whining vocal pyrotechnics ala our current popular overwrought diva wave of Celine Dions and Mariah Careys, and clumsy over-produced counterfeit country music.

The CIA has been using American music as a torture device to break the spirit and minds of the “enemy combatants” they’ve illegally kidnapped and are torturing and murdering in Guantanamo Bay Prison. Perhaps our CIA should switch to Mexican music instead.

Here in no particular odor is a list of American music the CIA has used to torture:

AC/DC (“Hells Bells,” “Shoot to Thrill”)
Aerosmith
Barney the Dinosaur (theme song)
Bee Gees (“Stayin’ Alive”)
Britney Spears
Bruce Springsteen (“Born in the USA”)
Christina Aguilera (“Dirrty”)
David Gray (“Babylon”)
Deicide
Don McLean (“American Pie”)
Dope (“Die MF Die,” “Take Your Best Shot”)
Dr. Dre
Drowning Pools (“Bodies”)
Eminem (“Kim,” “Slim Shady,” “White America”)
Lil’ Kim
Limp Bizkit
Matchbox Twenty (“Gold”)
Meat Loaf
Metallica (“Enter Sandman”)
Neil Diamond (“America”)
Nine Inch Nails (“March of the Pigs,” “Mr. Self Destruct”)
Prince (“Raspberry Beret”)
Queen (“We Are the Champions”)
Rage Against the Machine (“Killing in the Name”)
Red Hot Chili Peppers
Saliva (“Click Click Boom”)
The “Sesame Street” theme song
Tupac (“All Eyes on Me”)

[ thanks to Peter Ball of the music group Apartment One for sending me this list, which he got from “Music As Torture” By Terry Teachout, Wall Street Journal, 2-14-2009 ]


Mexican cake icing – foto by Smith

 

concrete TV

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

Concrete TV – foto by smith

I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.” – Groucho Marx

According to Nielsen, the average American watches 151 hours of TV a month, an increase of 3.6% from last year. That’s five hours a day. WikiAnswers claims it’s 8 hours 11 minutes per day. Nielsen also says teenagers (12-17) watch 103 hours each month, while senior citizens (65 and older) watch 207.That’s a lot of tube boobs. Since Lady and I watch zero TV, some boob must be watching a lot of tube to take our slack.

I prefer to read books. Here’s one I recently found educational – a masturbation manual:


Masturbation Manual – foto by smith

 

 
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